FanPost

Landis: "I've pretty much written off this season."

New article with quotes from Floyd Landis is up today at espn.com:

http://sports.espn.go.com/oly/cycling/news/story?id=2748021

Landis spokesman Michael Henson said the main reason the hearing hasn't been scheduled yet is that lawyers are still trying to obtain documents they feel are critical to prepare the rider's case -- a process known as discovery.

The rules governing discovery in anti-doping arbitration cases are much more restrictive than they are in a U.S. criminal or civil court. Landis' lawyer Howard Jacobs, who has defended several high-profile athletes accused of doping including Olympic track star Marion Jones and cyclist Tyler Hamilton, requested a number of additional technical and scientific documents he argued were pertinent to the case last fall. His request was denied by USADA.

A three-member American Arbitration Association panel will hear the case. Each side picks one arbitrator, and those two choose the third. The panel selection was completed only recently, although the arbitrators' names have not been made public.

Under USADA rules, the athlete's hearing is supposed to be held within three months of the panel being selected, but Henson said that Landis' legal team has asked for an extension of that time to deal with discovery issues.

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Looks like this is going to be a public show, whenever it happens:

Landis invoked a never-before-used clause that entitles him to a public hearing, and has requested it be held at Pepperdine University Law School in Malibu, Calif., which he and his team contend has adequate facilities to allow reasonable access for the public and news media.

The Pennsylvania native said he is spending more than $100,000 a month on expenses related to his case. He recently started a legal defense fund in an effort to raise the $2 million he estimates he might need by the time the process concludes.

"It's a race," he said. "I have to get enough money fast enough, I have to learn everything fast enough and I have to get the best help."

If Landis is really going to spend $2 million to defend himself, then either he is innocent and determined, or he is not innocent but delusional.  Maybe we'll found out which one by the end of the year.